physics & astronomy

Prof. Yates elected a Fellow of the American Physical Society

Steven Yates Receives Funding from National Science Foundation and National Nuclear Security Administration

Steve Yates, a professor in the Departments of Chemistry and Physics & Astronomy and Director of the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory (UKAL), recently received two grants.  One of these awards [1] is a renewal of funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF), which extends continuous NSF funding of work at UKAL to greater than fifty years.  This research is focused on advancing our fundamental understanding of the atomic nucleus.  The nucleus, composed of protons and neutrons, is billions of times smaller than is visibl

Talk with Dr. Pam Marcum, NASA SOFIA Project Scientist

Please, join us as we welcome a very special guest to the University, Dr. Pam M. Marcum, SOFIA Project Scientist with the NASA Ames Research Center! The Department of Physics & Astronomy invited Dr. Marcum to visit Campus and talk about her work with NASA and the SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) Project. Dr. Marcum will participate in several lectures and activities while on our Campus, and as she is a native of Lawrence County, Kentucky in the Appalachian Region of our State, The UK Appalachian Center is very excited to invite you to a talk and meet-and-greet here at the Center on Friday, April 15, 2016.  Dr. Marcum will talk about her Kentucky roots and her journey to the incredible work she does now. This is a free event, and UK Students, Staff, and Faculty are encouraged to attend and very welcome.  A light lunch will be served.  Please, read more about Dr. Marcum and her work here.

Date: 
Friday, April 15, 2016 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
UK Appalachian Center

The 2015-2016 Outstanding Teaching Award Recipients Announced

There will be an Awards Ceremony to honor the recipients of these and other College awards on Wednesday, April 22 at 4 pm in the WT Young Auditorium. A reception will follow the ceremony.

Shining a Light on Connections Between Worlds of Art and Science

The Art Museum at the University of Kentucky is hosting "Looking for Light: Chemistry, Art, Story, and Song," the third annual event of the Math, Arts, and Sciences Coalition (M.A.S.C.).

UK Students Win Kentucky Academy of Science Research Competitions

Thirteen University of Kentucky students took home top honors at the Kentucky Academy of Science 100th Annual Meeting in November, including eight students in the College of Arts & Sciences.

Science Policy in America

 

 

Dr. Tyler Glembo The American Physical Society Science Policy in America Fundamental scientific research, as a majority federally funded initiative, is becoming more deeply embedded in politics. Since the end of the Space Race, funding of basic physical sciences research as a percent GDP has continuously declined, indicating that policy makers see funding scientific research as less of a priority than they once did. Indeed, a lack of understanding about both science and how science is done amongst members of Congress has led to both reduced prioritization and also to misguided attempts at regulation, such as making peer review a public process and considering Congressional oversight for specific grants. Here we will examine a few current issues in science policy and the need for physicists to effectively weigh in on such policy issues. We will also consider the positive or negative effects such public engagement may have on our scientific careers and ways in which you can get involved.

 

 

A&S Hall of Fame 2014 - Dr. Keith B. MacAdam

Keith B. MacAdam was born in Rochester, N.Y., attended Swarthmore College and earned a doctorate in Physics in 1971. After research at University of Stirling in Scotland, Yale University, and the University of Arizona, he came to UK as an Assistant Professor in 1977. He built a campus-based research program in experimental atomic-molecular-optical (AMO) physics with students and post-docs, supported by the National Science Foundation and the Research Corporation. He was appointed Professor of Physics in 1986 and was a University Research Professor in 1990-91.

MacAdam’s research in crossed-beam collisions between charged particles and laser-excited atoms in highly excited “Rydberg” states was widely recognized in the international AMO physics community. He was elected a Fellow of the American Physical Society in 1987. Research in Aarhus, Denmark, Boulder, Colo., and Stockholm, Sweden, extended his international connections.

At UK MacAdam was active in all aspects of teaching, research and service. He taught with success at levels from first-year to graduate, and he introduced and continues to teach a non-majors’ physics course “How Things Work.” He served as Chair of the Department of Physics & Astronomy (1997-2001), on the College Executive Committee (Chair, 2007-08) and on many campus-wide committees. MacAdam was honored by the naming of the UK MacAdam Student Observatory, which opened in 2008 to serve the campus and community.

 

 

A&S Celebrates New Hall of Fame Members

The University of Kentucky College of Arts Sciences Hall of Fame induction and festivities are slated for Friday, Oct. 10, at 3:30 p.m. in the Recital Hall of the UK Singletary Center for the Arts.

Unravelling the Mysteries of Neutrinos

Dr. Stephen Parke Fermilab Neutrinos are the most numerous massive particles in the Universe. Their masses are very tiny, no larger than one millionth the mass of the electron. Are they like all the known massive fermions, being four component particles, or are they a new type of fermion never seen before, a two component fermion? Are there only only three neutrinos or are there more species of neutrinos? Of the three neutrinos we know of, we have determined part of the massing pattern but not the completely pattern. Also we have measured some of their mixing parameters with reasonable precision via neutrino oscillation experiments but not all. Do neutrinos violate CP in neutrino oscillations? Can neutrinos help explain the baryon-antibaryon asymmetry of the Universe? I will address many of the important questions about the neutrinos and how the future Fermilab program will address some of these questions.

 

 

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